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  • Installation on Gentoo Linux

    I have read the README.TXT file and am still confused about how to install Mirth on Linux.

    Where do the files need to be?

    What packages need to be built and run?

    I un-tar'd the archive into a directory off my home directory and then copied the public_html folder to my web directory. When I go to that address (http://servername/~lj/mirth/) I get the Launch Mirth Administrator page, but when I click the button to launch it, I get this error message from Apache.

    The requested URL /~lj/mirth/webstart.jnlp was not found on this server.

    I also have run the mysql script to create the database.

    I just am clueless as to what I need to do to get this installed and working.

    LJ Wilson

  • #2
    Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

    Mirth is self-contained, it does not need to be hosted by Apache or others.

    Here is the rough guide to how my team sets it up on Ubuntu boxes, aside from installing the Java packages it should be similar on Gentoo:

    1. Install Java JDK version 5 or 6, 5 is reccommended. I prefer the one directly from Sun.
    2. un-tar Mirth to its own path. I usually use /opt/Mirth, but anywhere should be OK.
    3. Check to see if Mirth is OK by running mirth.sh . This will run Mirth against a Derby database, it will simply prove that mirth has what it needs to start up and run.
    4. Point a browser to http://mymirthmachine:8080 and hit the green button. The Mirth admin console should load. You will obviously need the JRE on the client machine for this. The default login is admin/admin
    5. If you logged in, it worked!

    Now to move Mirth to a real database engine for its backend (like Postgres or MySQL):

    1. Stop the mirth service if it is running.
    2. Edit mirth.properties so that the database line is correct for your database. postgres, mysql, derby, etc.
    3. Edit the yourdb-SqlMapConfig.properties file to point to the correct database, username, and password.
    4. Run the SQL scripts against your database.
    5. Restart the mirth service and check it the same as steps 4 and 5 above.

    To have Mirth run as a system service use the mirth-daemon script and add it to your distributions rc.d, init.d, upstart, or whatever as appropriate.
    Jon Bartels

    Zen is hiring!!!!
    http://consultzen.com/careers/
    Talented healthcare IT professionals wanted. Engineers to sales to management.
    Good benefits, great working environment, genuinely interesting work.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

      Thanks for the help. I got it going using the derby database just fine. I then copied the mirth-daemon file to /etc/init.d/ and stopped the service, made changes to the SQL stuff and presto!

      All seems to be working just fine.

      Any tips on usage would be greatly appreciated as well.

      Thanks again,

      LJ

      Comment


      • #4
        Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

        eljay wrote:
        Thanks for the help. I got it going using the derby database just fine. I then copied the mirth-daemon file to /etc/init.d/ and stopped the service, made changes to the SQL stuff and presto!

        All seems to be working just fine.

        Any tips on usage would be greatly appreciated as well.

        Thanks again,

        LJ
        Usage tips vary based on what you want to do with Mirth. Fairly typical for a Java app though, give it as much memory as you're comfortable with (in one of the config files) and keep an eye on your database size if you are storing a lot of messages
        Jon Bartels

        Zen is hiring!!!!
        http://consultzen.com/careers/
        Talented healthcare IT professionals wanted. Engineers to sales to management.
        Good benefits, great working environment, genuinely interesting work.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

          Instead of copying the mirth-daemon to /etc/init.d I created a link
          ln -s /mirth directory/mirth-daemon /etc/init.d/mirth-daemon
          so when I reinstall or upgrade I do not need to worry about putting it in /etc/init.d

          I also put some scripts in /usr/local/bin (or anywhere in the path) such as mstatus, mstop and a mstart

          Here is mstatus:

          #bash
          /usr/local/mirth/mirth-daemon status

          Comment


          • #6
            Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

            Hi all,

            I am installing Mirth on Ubuntu Linux but cannot get it to run as a service.

            I have copied the mirth-daemon file to the /etc/init.d folder but it does not start on reboot. If I navigate to the folder where I installed Mirth (/home/user/Mirth), I can start it ok using mirth.sh or ./mirth-daemon -start

            Can anyone tell me what I am missing?

            Thanks in advance.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

              Code:
              sudo update-rc.d mirth defaults
              update-rc.d creates all of the links in rc.X that make things in init.d go. Might be mirth-daemon instead of mirth.
              Jon Bartels

              Zen is hiring!!!!
              http://consultzen.com/careers/
              Talented healthcare IT professionals wanted. Engineers to sales to management.
              Good benefits, great working environment, genuinely interesting work.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

                Hi Jon,

                Thanks for the reply. I tried the command with mirth-daemon and it updated the rc.d 0-6.

                After reboot, Mirth still won't start as service. Do environment variables matter to have it auto start? Or is there any user related factors that prevent it from running.

                running the command again gives me message "links already exist"

                I am new to linux so I don't know where to go to check logging.

                Thanks

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

                  It's probably something simple. The hard part is running down the checklist and finding it.

                  What install method did you use? Straight tarball or the JAR installer?
                  Where is Mirth installed?
                  What user/group owns the Mirth files?
                  Can you start the daemon using
                  Code:
                  sudo /etc/init.d/mirth-daemon start
                  ?
                  What is the airspeed of an unladen swallow?
                  Where are my pants?

                  I'll try to check on this thread again in a few hours. Post updates on your progress here or in IRC (#mirth on freenode).
                  Jon Bartels

                  Zen is hiring!!!!
                  http://consultzen.com/careers/
                  Talented healthcare IT professionals wanted. Engineers to sales to management.
                  Good benefits, great working environment, genuinely interesting work.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re:Installation on Gentoo Linux

                    Worked it out on IRC.

                    On Ubuntu, and presumably most other systems, you should symlink and not copy the mirth-daemon script into init.d. The script uses relative paths to find its executables so symlinking it is better. On Ubuntu once the script is symlinked into init.d run 'update-rc.d mirth-daemon defaults' and that will take care of putting it in the rc.x's .

                    Best practice would be to create a separate user for Mirth which owns the mirth install directory. Make sure the mirth-daemon script is updated to use that user.
                    Jon Bartels

                    Zen is hiring!!!!
                    http://consultzen.com/careers/
                    Talented healthcare IT professionals wanted. Engineers to sales to management.
                    Good benefits, great working environment, genuinely interesting work.

                    Comment

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